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SE Regional Climate Center
2221 Devine St., Suite 222
Columbia, SC 29205
Toll Free:
1-866-845-1553
Phone:
803-734-9560
          
803-734-9559
Fax:
803-734-9573
sercc@dnr.state.sc.us

 

 

Southern AER

A Quarterly Activity Bulletin of The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources - Southeast Regional Climate Center
Winter 1996
Volume 2, No. 3

Southern Weather Awareness Conference
for Educators and Community Leaders

The First Annual Southern Weather Awareness Conference for educators - including K-12 teachers of science, health, physical education, administrators, athletic directors, trainers, coaches and school transportation personnel - and community leaders will be held at Florida Tech's Melbourne Campus on February 15, 1997. Topics on hurricanes, tornadoes, lightning, flash floods, weather radar, satellites, emergency preparedness for schools and accessing real-time weather data will be addressed.

The American Meteorological Society's Project ATMOSPHERE Atmospheric Education Resource Agents from the Southern states, the Weather Channel, and the Southeast Regional Climate Center are organizing this event. The presenters will provide participants with hazardous weather content and materials, involve them in hands-on activities, and assist in establishing school emergency plans for hazardous weather events. Mark your calendars now and plan to attend this educational conference that could save your life!

For more information please contact Gene Syarto, 2115 Tappan Zee Lane, NE, Palm Bay, FL 32905-4010, Phone - evenings and weekends - (407)723-1189, Phone - weekdays - (407) 242-6400, FAX (407) 242-6427, or Email syartog@mail.firn.edu.

 

Cool Winter Weather

Introduction

Weather and climate play an important role in our daily lives. Many of our decisions - from what we wear to planning a vacation - are based on the weather. Without even realizing it, we make simple weather observations every day. For example, you know not to wear a sweater in Florida in August or a bathing suit in Washington D.C. in the middle of February. When it's gray and rainy outside you know to carry an umbrella. This activity will bring attention to the differences in weather and climate of particular areas.

Definitions and Background

 

Definitions for terms used in Tables 1 & 2

Avg Max - The Average Maximum Temperature (F) for this day.
Avg Min - The Average Minimum Temperature (F) for this day.
Hi Max - The Highest Maximum Temperature (F) ever recorded for this day followed by the year it occurred.
Lo Min - The Lowest Minimum Temperature (F) ever recorded for this day followed by the year it occurred.
Hi Prcp - The Highest Precipitation (in hundredths of inches) ever recorded for this day followed by the year it occurred.
Daily climate calendars provide average weather data for each day. This "average" is determined by averaging the weather each day for a 30 year span - 1961 through 1990.

Activity

1. List at least three different methods by which you can collect weather data for the city where which you live.

2. Where is your local weather station located?

USE TABLES 1 AND 2 TO ANSWER QUESTIONS 3 THROUGH 8.

          Daily Climate Calendar - 1961 to 1990
Station: (448906) WASHINGTON_NATL_WSCMO_A    Percent Missing:   0.02

                     FEBRUARY
_______________________________________________________________________________
|___Day__|____1____|____2____|____3____|____4____|____5____|____6___ |____7____|
| Avg Max| 44      | 44      | 43      | 43      | 42      | 42      | 42      |
| Avg Min| 28      | 27      | 28      | 27      | 27      | 26      | 26      |
|  Hi Max| 70 1988 | 72 1990 | 56 1983 | 58 1962 | 64 1962 | 61 1965 | 58 1964 |
|  Lo Min| 12 1965 |  4 1961 | 11 1961 | 11 1970 | 15 1965 | 10 1966 | 11 1988 |
| Hi Prcp| 92 1985 |135 1973 |107 1961 | 57 1986 | 27 1984 | 50 1964 |120 1965 |
_______________________________________________________________________________
|___Day__|____8____|____9____|___10____|___11____|___12____|___13____|___14____|
| Avg Max| 42      | 42      | 43      | 43      | 44      | 45      | 45      |
| Avg Min| 26      | 26      | 26      | 26      | 27      | 28      | 29      |
|  Hi Max| 65 1965 | 66 1990 | 63 1990 | 66 1981 | 63 1984 | 67 1974 | 73 1990 |
|  Lo Min| 11 1967 | 12 1967 |  6 1979 |  8 1979 | 13 1973 |  9 1979 |  7 1979 |
| Hi Prcp|163 1961 | 58 1970 | 46 1990 |191 1983 |137 1985 |177 1971 | 93 1984 |
_______________________________________________________________________________
|___Day__|___15____|___16____|___17____|___18____|___19____|___20____|___21____|
| Avg Max| 46      | 47      | 47      | 48      | 48      | 49      | 49      |
| Avg Min| 29      | 30      | 31      | 31      | 31      | 31      | 32      |
|  Hi Max| 68 1982 | 73 1976 | 79 1976 | 76 1976 | 70 1961 | 70 1971 | 69 1976 |
|  Lo Min| 14 1963 | 11 1963 |  8 1979 |  6 1979 | 12 1979 | 10 1979 |  9 1968 |
| Hi Prcp| 51 1964 | 30 1966 | 91 1982 | 65 1964 |116 1979 | 30 1981 | 92 1989 |
_______________________________________________________________________________
|___Day__|___22____|___23____|___24____|___25____|___26____|___27____|___28____|
| Avg Max| 50      | 50      | 49      | 49      | 49      | 49      | 50      |
| Avg Min| 32      | 32      | 32      | 32      | 32      | 31      | 32      |
|  Hi Max| 75 1974 | 73 1985 | 78 1985 | 72 1977 | 70 1977 | 74 1977 | 74 1976 |
|  Lo Min|  9 1963 | 12 1963 | 18 1967 | 11 1967 | 12 1970 | 13 1963 | 24 1986 |
| Hi Prcp|148 1971 | 95 1969 |167 1979 |112 1979 |106 1962 | 47 1962 | 90 1966 |
___________________
|___Day__|___29____|
| Avg Max| 51      |
| Avg Min| 33      |
|  Hi Max| 77 1972 |
|  Lo Min| 19 1980 |
| Hi Prcp| 62 1983 |
TABLE 1

 

          Daily Climate Calendar - 1961 to 1990
Station: ( 84570) KEY_WEST_WSO_AIRPORT    Percent Missing:   0.39

                     FEBRUARY
_______________________________________________________________________________
|___Day__|____1____|____2____|____3____|____4____|____5____|____6____|____7____|
| Avg Max| 76      | 76      | 76      | 76      | 75      | 75      | 75      |
| Avg Min| 65      | 66      | 66      | 66      | 65      | 65      | 65      |
|  Hi Max| 82 1982 | 82 1982 | 83 1982 | 83 1990 | 84 1982 | 84 1982 | 83 1985 |
|  Lo Min| 54 1980 | 50 1980 | 53 1981 | 51 1970 | 52 1966 | 49 1966 | 48 1978 |
| Hi Prcp| 17 1972 | 72 1961 |101 1970 | 63 1984 | 20 1987 |173 1965 | 76 1979 |
_______________________________________________________________________________
|___Day__|____8____|____9____|___10____|___11____|___12____|___13____|___14____|
| Avg Max| 75      | 74      | 74      | 74      | 74      | 74      | 75      |
| Avg Min| 65      | 64      | 64      | 64      | 64      | 64      | 65      |
|  Hi Max| 82 1965 | 83 1962 | 83 1990 | 83 1986 | 85 1982 | 82 1965 | 83 1965 |
|  Lo Min| 56 1964 | 55 1964 | 53 1979 | 51 1973 | 51 1973 | 56 1987 | 53 1987 |
| Hi Prcp|115 1978 |112 1972 | 24 1962 | 23 1985 | 43 1971 | 96 1968 |118 1982 |
_______________________________________________________________________________
|___Day__|___15____|___16____|___17____|___18____|___19____|___20____|___21____|
| Avg Max| 76      | 76      | 77      | 76      | 76      | 76      | 76      |
| Avg Min| 66      | 66      | 67      | 67      | 67      | 67      | 67      |
|  Hi Max| 82 1982 | 83 1965 | 83 1965 | 83 1965 | 84 1990 | 85 1984 | 84 1989 |
|  Lo Min| 49 1985 | 55 1985 | 54 1973 | 53 1977 | 57 1969 | 56 1969 | 55 1978 |
| Hi Prcp|130 1969 | 86 1970 | 53 1963 |192 1981 |125 1968 | 11 1968 |141 1984 |
_______________________________________________________________________________
|___Day__|___22____|___23____|___24____|___25____|___26____|___27____|___28____|
| Avg Max| 76      | 76      | 75      | 75      | 75      | 75      | 76      |
| Avg Min| 67      | 66      | 66      | 65      | 65      | 65      | 65      |
|  Hi Max| 85 1989 | 84 1990 | 84 1962 | 83 1962 | 82 1962 | 83 1962 | 83 1962 |
|  Lo Min| 51 1978 | 48 1978 | 54 1989 | 51 1989 | 49 1967 | 46 1989 | 59 1963 |
| Hi Prcp|254 1966 | 93 1990 | 88 1976 |101 1976 |105 1983 | 12 1975 | 76 1986 |
___________________
|___Day__|___29____|
| Avg Max| 76      |
| Avg Min| 66      |
|  Hi Max| 84 1987 |
|  Lo Min| 57 1986 |
| Hi Prcp| 23 1968 |
TABLE 2

3. Plot the average minimum temperature for Washington, DC and Key West, Florida for the month of February on the chart below. Use a different color for each city.

 

                  100
                  90
                  80
        (F)       70
                  60
                  50
                  40
                  30
                  20
                  10

                       5   10   15   20        25    30
                                Days of Month
A. Using this information, which city has warmer average low temperatures for February? Why is this so?

B. Using this information, which city has colder average low temperatures for February? Why is this so?

4. Use table 1 to find the lowest minimum temperature recorded for Washington, DC in February. What was the temperature? What day and year did it occur?

5. Use table 2 to find the highest maximum temperature recorded for Key West, Florida in February. What was the temperature? How many times and what were the dates?

6. What's the largest amount of precipitation recorded for each city in February? Include the day and year in your answer.

7. On the calendar provided, record the daily high temperature, low temperature, and precipitation for your area. After it is completed answer the following: A. On what date did the most precipitation occur?

B. On what date did the coldest low temperature occur?

C. On what date did the warmest high temperature occur?

D. Is the weather were you live more like the weather in Key West, Florida, or like Washington, DC? Why do you think that is so?

 

8. Using the data you collected, calculate the average low temperature, average high temperature and total precipitation for your city for February. How do the numbers compare to normal for your area?

 

TEACHERS Click here to send mail for answers to the activity questions.

Note: The use of graph-reading skills and map-reading skills are practiced using this activity. Teachers should share this activity with geography teachers, math teachers and media specialists who might like to use this activity, too.

 

Southern AER is a quarterly publication of the Southeast Regional Climate Center. Funding is provided by a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Weather and Climate Resources for the Classroom

INTERNET RELATED SITES

For Weather Education on the Internet http://faldo.atmos.uiuc.edu/WEATHER/weather.html

For Weather Maps, Satellite,and Radar on the Internet

  http://cirrus.sprl.umich.edu/wxnet (Links to weather sites)
http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/index.html (Satellite)
http://www.weather.com (Weather Channel, International weather)

For NWS Watches and Warnings

  http://www.met.tamu.edu:80/personnel/students/weather/warning.html

For International Weather Sites

  http://www.srh.noaa.gov/tlh/wxhwy.html

For Earth Science/Environmental Science on the Internet

  http://www.geophysics.geol.uoa.gr/frame_en/insti/seisurf.html
http://www.noaa.gov
http://www.mth.uea.ac.uk/ocean/oceanography.html

For Other Related Subjects on the Internet

  http://www.si.edu
http://lcweb.loc.gov
http://spacelink.msfc.nasa.gov
http://www.tc.cornell.edu/Edu/MathSciGateway/
http://www.npr.org/
http://www.mills.edu/ACAD_INFO/MCS/SPERTUS/Gender/wom_and_min.html

 

Weather Trivia

Did you know that... The lowest temperature recorded in the United States (excluding Alaska) was -70F in Rogers Pass, Montana.
The lowest temperature recorded in the United States was -80F in Prospect Creek, Endicott Mountains, Alaska.
The lowest temperature recorded in the world was -129F in Vostok, Antarctica.
The greatest snowfall in North America in 24 hours was 76 inches in Silver Lake, Colorado.
The greatest snowfall in one storm in North America was 189 inches at Mount Shasta Ski Bowl, California.

 

Permission is granted for the reproduction of materials contained is this publication.

Southern AER
Southeast Regional Climate Center
S.C. Department of Natural Resources
1201 Main Street, Suite 1100
Columbia, South Carolina 29201

The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, national origin, disability, religion, or age. Direct all inquiries to the Office of Human Resources, P.O. Box 167, Columbia, SC 29202.

 

 

sercc@dnr.state.sc.us